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Nurses strike at two NYC hospitals ends after three days

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A three-day strike by the nurses’ union at two New York City hospitals has ended after a deal was struck early Thursday morning.

About 7000 nurses have promised to go back to work by 7 a.m. at Mount Sinai and Montefiore hospitals.

“This is a historic victory for New York City nurses and for nurses across the country. NYSNA nurses have done the impossible, saving lives night and day, throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and now we’ve again shown that nothing is impossible for nurse heroes,” Nancy Hagans, president of the New York State Nurses Association, said. “Through our unity and by putting it all on the line, we won enforceable safe staffing ratios at both Montefiore and Mount Sinai where nurses went on strike for patient care. Today, we can return to work with our heads held high, knowing that our victory means safer care for our patients and more sustainable jobs for our profession.”

The nurses hit the picket line over pay raises and understaffing. Nurses at five other city hospitals had also threatened to walk off the job on Monday, but were able to strike agreements.

Montefiore and Mount Sinai said that they offered the union the same deal that other hospitals offered, but their nurses held out for better staffing ratios, the union said.

“We came to these bargaining sessions with great respect for our nurses and with proposals that reflect their priorities in terms of wages, benefits, safety, and staffing,” Dr. Philip O. Ozuah, Montefiore CEO, said. “We are pleased to offer a 19% wage increase, benefits that match or exceed those of our peer institutions, more than 170 new nursing positions and a generous plan to address recruitment and retention.”

This is a developing story.

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